Prevalence

The use of stimulants such as amphetamines, cocaine or ecstasy is not as common among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as the use of other illicit drugs such as cannabis [31278]. However there is still a significant number of stimulant users in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, particularly for amphetamines and ‘other drugs’. Other drugs (including ecstasy and cocaine) are the third most commonly used substance among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people [31278]. Amphetamines or speed is the fourth most commonly used substance. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander males are more likely to use stimulants than females.

The use of amphetamines has shown a decline in surveys nationally for the total population, however there is evidence that the more harmful crystal form of amphetamine (crystal methamphetamine or ice) has become more common [33725][30029]. Hospitalisation for mental disorders from amphetamine use has increased in recent years with evidence that regional areas are affected more than metropolitan areas and Aboriginal people are experiencing a disproportionate burden of harm from amphetamines [34492]. In 2015-16, amphetamines were the second most common illicit drug people sought help for from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander primary health care substance use services [33167].

References

Key resources

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